posted by [identity profile] ste-noni.livejournal.com at 12:38pm on 12/02/2009
Well, if there was a way, he would need to file an N-600 with USCIS. I used to adjudicate those petitions when I worked there so I'm fairly familiar with them.

I can't find my nifty chart here at work - it's a very hard issue to research because you have to use the law in place at the time of birth and those laws aren't usually in the books anymore. (Maybe not hard for a legal librarian, but always super frustrating for me.)

Anyway, I will go home and double check but I suspect that either both parents had to be USCs before the guy was 18 or some variation on that (like if his mom died or the parents were divorced or something). If the guy is 84, that means he was born around 1925, right?

My immigration law professor was a stateless person for a while. His parents were of Japanese descent but were US citizens. He was born in Japan but somehow, because his parents weren't citizens, he was not one either. He came here when he was very young and was stateless until he was maybe 3 or 4.

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